Stuttgart
6 - September - 1943

NOTE: Elipses (...) denote words that were unreadable

This report came off a teletype machine, which means no paragraphs. In the interest of making it easier to read, formatting has been added.

 

S-1. From 75 to 150 e/a were reported over the whole route into and back from Stuttgart. Of these FW 190s and Me 109s were in the extreme majority. One Me 210 and one Me 110 were confirmed and several other t/e e/a were reported. Some crews report there were more FW 190s and others that Me 109s were more numerous. One crew reported that well inside Germany, virtually no FW 190s were seen and only Me 109s were in evidence.

E/a were again multicolored. FWs were in several instances yellow-nosed. Some of them were seen to have white cowlings like P-47 a/c. A few with yellow tails and brown or gray fuselages were seen. Black and white bellies were also observed. Some yellow wingtips on gray fuselages were also observed. Some red noses were seen on gray fuselages. A few silver gray and light blue FW 190s were seen also. A few were all black. The Me 109 a/c were also widely varied in colors. Some were solid black, others a dirty gray or brown. A few were silver with yellow stripes on wings. Brown and green ones were observed. Several were bluish-green on top and very hard to see against the landscape below.

A very few e/a were first observed at 0808 crossing the French coast at Berk sur Mer [sic] on way in. At 0815 a few more e/a were seen in vicinity 5013N 0222E and here one or two passes were attempted by these e/a. At 0820 in the vicinity of St. Quentin 3 e/a were encountered in large numbers and attacked continuously and heavily for about 25-30 minutes until about 0845 at about 100 miles due east of Paris. Thereafter attacks by e/a were considerably reduced as the rest of route to Stuttgart and back to a line running north and south about 100 miles E and S of Paris. During this period of about an hour and 15 minutes single attacks and attacks by two and threes at intervals of several minutes characterized the relatively weak nature of the inland defenses. In Stuttgart area at from about 0947-1000 hours a greater number of attacks were experienced by a/c milling around in sky over area. These decreased again on route back until a/c reached a line about 100 miles E and S of Paris at from 1125 to 1150 hours when once again large numbers of e/a were encountered. Of the a/c routing themselves over the vicinity of Epernay, several reported that attacks virtually ceased for a time while P-47 escorts provided close support. Later P-47s left and then several other attacks were experienced until French coast was crossed just N of Dieppe. Several a/c routed themselves just to the south of Paris and west therefrom. These a/c enjoyed no friendly fighter support and experienced a running shuttle service of e/a attacks until crossing French coast at Tronville.

E/a attacked almost entirely toward nose from twelve to two o'clock and at tail from five to seven o'clock. Only one beam attack at three o'clock was reported. Nose attacks were usually from above, finishing off below in a dive or in turn to right or left. Many level nose and tail attacks were also reported. More close attacks were experienced on route in to target. Hoing in, majority of the attacks [sic]. Returning, a majority, [sic] in several cases, were tail attacks. In other attacks, more nose attacks were still attempted. Only an occasional attack was pressed home against any formation. Normally e/a could break off at a considerable distance. On the other hand some crews report great attention paid to numerous stragglers by e/a and many determined attacks made on these. Other crews report e/a would in many cases left the stragglers alone where they appeared damaged and unlikely to make it back and in such cases would concentrate on the formation. Most attacks could be turned away at extreme range by firing a few short bursts.

A new novel system of using black or dark-colored night fighters with great effect during the daytime was observed. About 50 miles SW of Stuttgart on way into target, a close and tightly concentrated series of bursts of black gunfire were observed to appear as a large black cloud about a mile ahead of the formation and at about same altitude as formation approached several at altitude. As formation approached, several all black e/a attacked from out of the black cloud at eleven o'clock level and were seen at all until at very close range and too late to fire. Only one out of 5-10 attacking were seen soon enough, and this was sufficiently low that its silhouette against the bright sky and cloud background effected by the close concentration of bursts was an extremely effective camouflage or smoke screen for these dark-colored fighters. Two occasions of this new tactic were reported.

Most nose attacks were apparently not aimed at the fuselage but at the engines and attempts to spray engines were repeatedly observed. System of attacks on single stragglers was observed to be a series of single attacks lined up one after the other from rear and above and slightly to one side at about five and seven o'clock. E/a would start well above on one side and execute a falling leaf approach toward the loan straggler. E/a would then pass under straggler and slide off other side to a position above and to the rear and then begin another falling leaf approach, finishing up high on other side of straggler after having passed under after attack. Coordinated and repeated attacks of this nature were observed to be in operation. Upon two occasions FW 190 a/c were observed to stand off at six o'clock at extreme range almost a mile and fire rocket projectiles at formation. This beginning of the rockets' flight under the wings of the e/a were seen, but after a short distance the projectile was no longer seen. Two occasions of air-to-air bombing reported in detail of ...were experienced. No attacks from out of the sun were experienced.

The P-47 withdrawal support was unanimously acclaimed as excellent, but that support did not last long enough.


S-2. 1807, Berck sur Mer, 16,000, meager, black, inaccurate. Type of fire control is unknown.
0832, St. Quentin, 16,200 ,meager, black, accurate for elevation, inaccurate for deflection, continuously pointed fire.
0843, Raims, 18,000, meager, black, accurate, continuously pointed fire.
? Karlesruhe, 24,000, meager, black, accurate for elevation but to right, continuously pointed fire.
0953, Stuttgart, 24,000, moderate, black and white. This gunfire was not being aimed at this group, but appeared from a distance that a barrage was being laid down.
At this point ten large blood red bursts were observed, which may have been used as height sightings.
1151, Beauvais, 16,000, meager, black, accurate for elevation but to right, continuously pointed fire.
1212, Dieppe, 14,000, meager, black, inaccurate, continuously pointed first.

S-3. Seven a/c of the 92nd Bomb Group were lost and one wrecked as follows.
A/c 668-J reported ditched, crew rescued at 1310.
A/c 428-O reported ditched, crew rescued.
A/c 965-L reported S.O.S. at 5038N 0038E at 1243 hours. Crew rescued.
A/c 000-D unreported.
A/c 890-C unreported.
A/c 198-M crash landed in England at 5051N 0035E at hours [sic]. Three men injured. Seven returned to base. A/c back.
A/c 010-X observed to crash 5018N 0210E at 0815 hours. Five men parachuted. Three chutes blossomed. One chute failed to open. One chute was afire. Apparently no e/a attacking and no flak.
A/c observed burning amidship at 16,500. Wing broke off at 16,000 1225 hours at 5030N 0040E at 10,000 feet. A/c ditched in sea.
1229 hours at 5047N 0029E at 12,000 feet a/c ditched in sea. A probable dinghy observed in sea at 1221 hours 5015N 0050E at 16,000 feet.

Unidentified B-17s observed in distress over enemy territory as follows.
At 1017 hours, 1025 hours and 1054 at 4855N 0850E at 24,000 feet. Three a/c observed at 15-20,000 feet losing altitude rapidly heading for Switzerland.
At 1200 hours at 4858N ... [says 92 29 but above the 92 is a 0 and above the 9 and the 29 is a 0]... E at 15,000 feet.
A/c observed gliding down under control at 6,000 feet heading southwest. No parachutes.
At 1156 hours at 4925N 0148E at 16,000 feet a/c observed heading north in glide at 2,000 feet. Nine parachutes seen.
At 1020 hours at 4820N 0640E at 18,000 feet a/c observed going down in steep glide under attack by e/a at 12,000 feet. No parachutes.
At 1000 hours at IP at 24,000 feet a/c observed circling down smoking badly at 16,000 feet under attack by e/a. No parachutes seen.
At 0842 hours at 4930N 0335E at 18,000 feet a/c observed going down at 15,000 feet and at 8,000 feet under control under attack by e/a. No parachutes seen.
At 1000 hours eight miles SE at Stuttgart at 24,000 feet a/c observed going down in spin under attack by e/a. No parachutes.
At 0950 hours at 4825N 0850E at 24,000 a/c 841-H one engine feathered holding altitude at 24,000 feet headed south into Switzerland.
At 1003 hours seven miles SW of Stuttgart at 24,000 a/c observed spinning down at 20,000 feet under attack by e/a. No parachutes seen.
At 1159 hours 4940N 0130E12/11/2003 at 16,000 feet a/c observed gliding down and turning back to land under control all props turning. Four parachutes seen, one of which opened but failed to bloom out, sailing like a ribbon.
At 0947 hours over Stuttgart at 24,000 a/c observed at 12,000 feet apparently heavily hit by flak, smoking and in steep dive. No chutes were seen.
At 1019 at 4850N 0750E at 24,000 feet a/c observed at 12,000 feet heading 330 degrees going down fast out of control. No chutes seen.
At 1136 ten miles N of Paris at 16,000 feet a/c observed at 10,000 feet heading 340 degrees under heavy attack by e/a. Ten chutes seen. All delayed opening.


S-4. A/c 198-M made crash landing near Penhurst Airfield on coast at 1255. This a/c ran out of gas, forcing crew to make emergency landing. Pilot, copilot and ball turret gunner were injured in crash and taken to hospital. Other crew members have returned to base and have been interrogated. The damage to this a/c is Category E.

S-5. Of twelve a/c appraised for battle damage, six are in Category A and one mentioned above in Category E.

S-6. Crew of two planes reported flak thrown up approximately a mile away with e/a attacking through the flak. The approaching e/a thus appeared as black bursts that was deceptive and hard to distinguish.
More e/a reported over France than over Germany and dromes in Germany showed little activity.
Drome at Albert, France, showed evidences of bombing and heavy explosions. Though hangars were not hit there was no activity on field. Two crews made this same report.
Railroad yards at Gournay, France, reported in use in spite of recent bombing.
Heavy concentration of shipping on Rhine River reported. Type of vessels not given.
At 1002 and 1020 two (2) B-17s were seen heading toward Switzerland. Letter H on fin of one was identified.
Twelve small boats anchored at 4955N 0100E (coast west of Dieppe) reported from plane at 14,000 feet altitude.
Air to air bombing observed on group behind 92nd. Type of e/a not determined. Bursts well timed for altitude.

S-7. Results were unobserved. Seven a/c dropped on Strassburg and seven a/c dropped on Baden Baden. One a/c failed to bomb as it exploded before reaching target. Whether six remaining a/c bombed is unknown as three of the four crews rescued at sea and one a/c landing elsewhere have not been interrogated and it is not known whether two of our three missing a/c bombed or not.

S-8. One crewman suggested straps be put on wrists of heated gloves to allow tightening. Aprons on tails guns said to hinder operation of guns. This report was made by one tail gunner. Flame dampers said to add to kick of tail guns. Change of British sight suggested by gunners of one crew stating dark glass is not good for the operations.

S-9.
  1. 21 B-17s took off from base at 0606 to 0617.
  2. Friendly coast was crossed at Dungeness at 0756 on route out and at Hastings at 1234 on route back.
  3. Route followed was reasonably close to briefed route going out to IP, which was overshot and bomb run made northwest instead of northeast. Being unable to bomb primary target, groups dispursed to attack targets of opportunity.
  4. Enemy coast was crossed at Le Touquet at 0807 on route out and Le Trepor at 1214 route out.
  5. Targets of opportunity attacked by 92nd low group in combat wing. Baden Baden at 1007 on 290 degrees true heading. Strassburg at 1017 on 290 degrees true heading.
  6. B-17s landed at base 1315 to 2010 and one crew (a/c #8688) J out of gas ditched at 1235 in Pevensey Bay Bay a few miles off Beachy Head. Picked up at 1310. (A/c floated 35 minutes). Crew returned to base at 2135.
  7. Formation flew over primary, Stuttgart, due to 9/10 to 10/10 cloud cover could not bomb so sought target of opportunity.
  8. No a/c returned early.

S-10. No nickels.


Statistical Report

 

A. 92
B. 21
C. 0
D. 0
E. 0
F. 17
G. 2
H. 0
I. 1
J. 0
K. 2 (in addition to three missing a/c and crew, 4 a/c lost in Channel, but crew saved and one a/c crash landed in England crew safe, due to lack of gas)
L. 1000-1017
M. 23,500 to 24,000
N. 8 a/c 40 100 IBs at Baden Baden
7 a/c 40 100 IBs at Strassburg
2 a/c 40 100s at Wasselone
O. 1x40x100 IB on... target
P. 0
Q. 0-1-3-30
R. 15-3-5
S. No nickels carried


Another Statistical Report

 

A. 92
B. 21
C. 0
D. 0
E. 0
F. 13
G. 1 exploded before target
H. 0
I. 0
J. 0
K. 5
L. 1007 to 1017
M. 23,500 to 24,000
N. 7 40 100 IBs to Baden Baden
6 40 100 IBs to Strassburg
(1) 121 40 100 IBs
(2) 8 40 100 IBs including 5 a/c missing through Air Sea Rescue. One a/c landed elsewhere not yet interrogated.
O. 0
P. 0
Q. 0-1-2-50
R. 6-1-2
S. Nickels none


Telephone Report

 

1. 92nd
2. 21
3. one down before target
4. 0-0-0 targets of opportunity 9. Bombing results of eleven a/c unknown and four landed elsewhere. Two were rescued at sea. Five has not been heard from.
5. Eight, including five unaccounted for. Two air sea rescue and one exploded over France.
6. unobserved
7. 0-0-60
8. mediocre
9. 2-5-1
10. meager to moderate
11. 9/10 to 10/10 over Stuttgart
vis. 3-5 miles
weather caused a/c to attack target of opportunity
12. Concentration of shipping in Rhine. Gournay marshalling yards again in use. Evidence of large explosion at Alverts air drome.
13. Nickels none. Carried incendiaries.


Flash Report

 

A. Approximate number of a/c attacking primary target:  [blank]
 
B. Approximate number of a/c attacking secondary target:  [there is a check, then says] (Karlsruhe)
 
C. Approximate number of a/c attacking target of last resort:  [blank]
 
D. Approximate number of a/c attacking target of opportunity:  [blank]
 
E. Reason for attacking target of opportunity:   [blank]
 
F. # of a/c known to be missing and # unaccounted for:
missing: 1
unaccounted for: 9
 
G. Bombing results:
( ) good
( ) fair
( ) poor
(x) unobserved
 
H. Weather, very brief:
Overcast, 7-9/10. Good visibility, 3-5 miles at...[Karlsruhe?]...[and then beside that] Stuttgart
 
I. Flak: moderate
Enemy aircraft opposition: 60-70
 
J. Friendly fighter support:
At Paris coming out, good.

[Below that, handwritten] Landed in England Foster, Leland, Wood, ... [looks like Baur; probably Baier]... McLaughlin scratched out; Jones written in above (crash in England, ... [4?]... injured), Grabowski. SOS over water Holden, [Jones scratched out], Belongia [picked up is scratched out], Carlson. Down in France. Asher back, George and McLaughlin picked up by A/S Rescue. Belongia. Unaccounted for: 9.

[Written in at bottom of page:] (Jones 1984 injured near Gotwich crashed)


Flak Report

 

1. Route followed: See back of page
 
2. Visibility at target. Any condensation trails:
3-5 miles visibility with 9/10-10/10 clouds at Stuttgart. No condensation trails.
 
3. # of a/c over target and actual a/c over target:
21 a/c over enemy territory
 
4. Formation over target with height of each a/c. Those a/c damaged by flak to be circled. If seriously damaged include small s. If any a/c shot down by flak, say so.
21 a/c over enemy territory.

[A/c circled on the report are colored red here.]

Lead Squadron
Lead 231
Right wing 387
Left wing 717
2nd element 171
Right wing 802
Left wing 423
3rd element 712

High Squadron
Lead 708
Right wing 186
Left wing 010
2nd element 428
Right wing 198
Left wing 965
3rd Element 008

Low Squadron
Lead 638
Right wing 648
Left wing 408
2nd element 007
Right wing 165
Left wing 000
3rd element 890

Note: This formation is not correct in all respects since eight of our a/c have not been interrogated.

 
5. General axis of attack (from lead a/c if possible).
30 degrees (true bearing) axes of attack at Baden Baden and Strassburg is uncertain.
 
6. How long did formation fly straight and level before bombing? Time flat for run.
70 seconds at Strassburg.
 
7. Turn after bombing; degrees of turn.
gradual 90 degree turn to left after leaving Stuttgart.
 
8. Position of group in relation to other groups. Distance between groups is in doubt, say so.
low group
 
9. What evasive action was taken? Give full particulars. Was there a change in elevation before bombing?
Side to side movement with no change in elevation.
 
10. A short description of flack en route (if any) and at the target, including, if possible, a suggestion as to type control employeed, i.e., continuous, following, predicted concentrations for different barrages or fixed barrages.
See back of page.
 
11. Any other comments, phenomena, etc.
White bursts mentioned in number ten were at least 1,000 feet above a/c at which aimed.

On the back of the page:

 

See #1. Dungeness
to Le Touquet
to Hascin
to Albert
to...[Peronne?]...
to St. Quentin
to ten miles from... [looks like Reian]...
to 49° 25'S 04° 13'E
to 49° 16'N 04° 40'E
to 49° 09'N 04° 58'N
to 48° 49'N 06° 28'E
to 48° 47'N
to 08° 02'E [sic]
to 48° 36'N 08 52'E (IP)
to 48° 29'N 09° 12'E
to target
to 48° 50'N 09° 05'E
to 48° 45'N 08° 58'E
to Baden Baden
to Schwar[z?]ach
to 48° 36'N 07° 51'E
to Strassburg
to 48° 38'N 07° 32'E
to 48 27N 06 44E
to 48 53N 02 50E
to six miles southeast of Beauvais
to 49 33N 01 32E to Le Treport.

 

See #10.
0807 Berck sur Mer 16,000 meager black inaccurate type of fire control is unknown
0832 St. Quentin 16,200 meager black accurate for elevation,
inaccurate for deflection
continuously pointed fire
0843 Raims 18,000 meager black accurate continuously pointed fire
Karlsruhe 24,000 meager black accurate for elevation but to right continuously pointed fire
0953 Stuttgart 24,000 moderate black & white This gunfire was not being aimed at this group. It appeared to be from a distance that barrage was being laid down. At this position ten large blood red bursts were observed, which may have been used as height sightings.
1151 Beauvais 16,000 meager black accurate for elevation but to right continuously pointed fire
1212 Dieppe 14,000 meager black inaccurate continuously pointed fire


Air to Air Bombing

 

1. Direction:
SE heading into France just after crossing coast-- about five minutes after leaving coast at 16,500
 
2. Elevation above Fortress:  [blank]
 
3. Did e/a fly parallel to our formation?  not known
 
4. Type:  [blank]
Bomb Fittings:  Not known. Long cylindrical bombs.
 
5. First area of bombs:  no bursts
 
6. Description of bombs, shape, etc.:
Were about eight missles in a cluster falling through formation and going straight down. No forward movement of
 
7. ...[something is written over it or it was x'd out.] seen
No forward movement of [something over the word] /a seen. Bombs of outside ... black smoke... our IB bombs but a little smaller. They did not explode nor hit a B-17 to... [typed over #8.]
 
8. Distance ... Aircraft felt blast.
No... observed on ground.
 
9. Time fuse:  [blank]
On burst or impact:  [blank]
 
10. Any strange radio signals?  Not known.
 
11. Number of bombs from aircraft:  Right in a cluster
 
12. Color of bursts.  No bursts.

[This report was a carbon copy. The two pages were not lined up exactly, hence the difficulty in reading it.]

Observer:  bombardier
a/c 165 G

He observed that no bomb bay doors were open in his formation at the time.
No formation above either.
This was after Lt. Asher's ship went down.

[At the top it says a/c 165 G, Lt. Baier's crew]


Hot News Report

Immediate Priority
The following information is to be telephoned at once to Duty Intelligence Officer at Wing. No delays in securing or transmitting it can be permitted.

 

1. ( ) Friendly a/c down in distress at sea
(x) Friendly a/c down in distress over enemy territory
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress elsewhere
( ) Dinghies, life rafts or persons in distress

Observing a/c:
Group: 92nd
# or letter: 965 L
Height: 24,000

Aircraft in distress: ...
Time seen: 1100
Approximate position: near Troyes
Heading: [blank]
Height: [blank]
Condition: [blank]
Parachutes seen: none
Dinghies seen: [blank]

Other remarks: Saw about four B-17s [then drawing of H inside a triangle] group knocked out of formation near Troyes. Looked as though they were going down.

 
2. Enemy shipping, naval units or convoys at sea: [blank]
 
3. Other hot news: [blank]

handwritten on back:

49 40' N picked up by... [pages stapled together]... French destroyer 1245 F. S. du Combatlante or Combattante London Captain de Coivet A. 2 About F. S. du Combattante London de Coivet, Capt. A. Patou, Lt. E. J. Aburtrnur engineer.


Hot News Report

Immediate Priority
The following information is to be telephoned at once to Duty Intelligence Officer at Wing. No delays in securing or transmitting it can be permitted.

 

1. ( ) Friendly a/c down in distress at se:
(x) Friendly a/c down in distress over enemy territory
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress elsewhere
( ) Dinghies, life rafts or persons in distress

Observing a/c:
Group: 92nd
# or letter: R 996
Height: 17,680

Aircraft in distress # or letter: unobserved
Time seen: 1157
Approximate position: 49° 20'N, 01° 58'E
Heading: 322° mag
Height: 5,000
Condition: in glide
Parachutes seen: none
Dinghies seen: none

Other remarks:  one feathered engine. Plane was in slow glide, losing alt. No smoke or fire seen.

 
2. Enemy shipping, naval units or convoys at sea: [blank]
 
3. Other hot news: [blank]


Hot News Report

Immediate Priority
The following information is to be telephoned at once to Duty Intelligence Officer at Wing. No delays in securing or transmitting it can be permitted.

 

1. ( ) Friendly a/c down in distress at sea
(x) Friendly a/c down in distress over enemy territory
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress elsewhere
( ) Dinghies, life rafts or persons in distress

Observing a/c:
Group: 92nd
# or letter: 235 I
Height: 16,000 feet

Aircraft in distress: 010 X
Time seen: 0815
Approximate position: [looks like it says] Hasden-- 5020N 0210E
Heading: 150 mag
Height: 16,500
Condition: wing come off [sic]-- fire in middle of a/c
Parachutes seen: five-- one didn't open; one burned up
Dinghies seen: [blank]

Other remarks: No flak or fighters (crew thinks incendiaries caught fire)

 
2. Enemy shipping, naval units or convoys at sea: [blank]
 
3. Other hot news: [blank]


Hot News Report

Immediate Priority
The following information is to be telephoned at once to Duty Intelligence Officer at Wing. No delays in securing or transmitting it can be permitted.

 

1. ( ) Friendly a/c down in distress at sea
(x) Friendly a/c down in distress over enemy territory
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress elsewhere
( ) Dinghies, life rafts or persons in distress

Observing a/c:
Group: 92nd
# or letter: L 717
Height: 16,900

Aircraft in distress: B-17 Asher's a/c 010 X
Time seen: 0811
Approximate position: 0210E 5015N
Heading: 175°
Height: --
Condition: a/c finally crash landed
Parachutes seen: two chutes opened
Dinghies seen:

Other remarks: one chute didn't open

 
2. Enemy shipping, naval units or convoys at sea:
 
3. Other hot news:


Hot News Report

Immediate Priority
The following information is to be telephoned at once to Duty Intelligence Officer at Wing. No delays in securing or transmitting it can be permitted.

 

1. ( ) Friendly a/c down in distress at sea
(x) Friendly a/c down in distress over enemy territory
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress elsewhere
( ) Dinghies, life rafts or persons in distress

Observing a/c:
Group: 92nd
# or letter: 408 Q
Height: 16,000

Aircraft in distress: B-17 seen at 0815
Time seen:
Approximate position: 52° 20' N 02° 00'E
Heading: 150° mag
Height: 8,000
Condition: peeled off to right circling down. Then it squirted three chutes out. One did not open
Parachutes seen: [blank]
Dinghies seen: --

Other remarks: This ship believed to be Asher's. It exploded and broke in two before disappearing under clouds.

 
2. Enemy shipping, naval units or convoys at sea: [blank]
 
3. Other hot news: [blank]


Hot News Report

Immediate Priority
The following information is to be telephoned at once to Duty Intelligence Officer at Wing. No delays in securing or transmitting it can be permitted.

 

1. ( ) Friendly a/c down in distress at sea
(x) Friendly a/c down in distress over enemy territory
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress elsewhere
( ) Dinghies, life rafts or persons in distress

Observing a/c:
Group: 92nd
# or letter: 712 R
Height: observed at 16,000 feet

Aircraft in distress: 010 X
Time seen: 0815
Approximate position: 50° 15'N 02° 00'E
Heading: 160° mag
Height: 16,000
Condition: wing breaking off
Parachutes seen: 3 one did not open; was burning
Dinghies seen: [blank]

Other remarks: a/c seemed to be disintegrating and on fire into middle section

 
2. Enemy shipping, naval units or convoys at sea: blank
 
3. Other hot news: blank


Hot News Report

Immediate Priority
The following information is to be telephoned at once to Duty Intelligence Officer at Wing. No delays in securing or transmitting it can be permitted.

 

1. ( ) Friendly a/c down in distress at sea
(x) Friendly a/c down in distress over enemy territory
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress elsewhere
( ) Dinghies, life rafts or persons in distress

Observing a/c:
Group: 92nd
# or letter: C-802
Height: 16,000

Aircraft in distress: # or letter unknown
Time seen: 0840
Approximate position: 49° 34'N-03° 24' E
Heading: 225° mag
Height: 12,000
Condition: out of control
Parachutes seen: 4 open; one did not open
Dinghies seen: --

Other remarks: smoke coming out of radio... [comp?]... then the bombs seen to explode

 
2. Enemy shipping, naval units or convoys at sea: [blank]
 
3. Other hot news: [blank]


Hot News Report

Immediate Priority
The following information is to be telephoned at once to Duty Intelligence Officer at Wing. No delays in securing or transmitting it can be permitted.

 

1. ( ) Friendly a/c down in distress at sea
(x) Friendly a/c down in distress over enemy territory
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress elsewhere
( ) Dinghies, life rafts or persons in distress

Observing a/c:
Group: 92nd
# or letter: R 996
Height:

Aircraft in distress: 010 X
Time seen: 0841
Approximate position: ... [looks like Chanoinille]
Heading: 134° mag
Height: 12,000
Condition: blew up
Parachutes seen: 3 one did not open
Dinghies seen: none

Other remarks: No 3 engine was afire and losing alt. Started back toward England then turned back on course. The ship blew in two at the wings and the bombs seen to explode.

 
2. Enemy shipping, naval units or convoys at sea: none
 
3. Other hot news: [blank]


Hot News Report

Immediate Priority
The following information is to be telephoned at once to Duty Intelligence Officer at Wing. No delays in securing or transmitting it can be permitted.

 

1. ( ) Friendly a/c down in distress at sea
(x) Friendly a/c down in distress over enemy territory
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress elsewhere
( ) Dinghies, life rafts or persons in distress

Observing a/c:
Group: 92nd
# or letter: 198
Height: 17,000

Aircraft in distress: 010 X
Time seen: 0818
Approximate position: 50° 18'N-02° 12'E
Heading: 120
Height: 6,000 approximate to ground
Condition: burning mid-ship
Parachutes seen: 3 1 didn't open
Dinghies seen: [blank]

Other remarks: [blank]

 
2. Enemy shipping, naval units or convoys at sea: [blank]
 
3. Other hot news: [blank]


Hot News Report

Immediate Priority
The following information is to be telephoned at once to Duty Intelligence Officer at Wing. No delays in securing or transmitting it can be permitted.

[Penciled in at top: fighter base # 127]

1. (x) Friendly a/c down in distress at sea
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress over enemy territory
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress elsewhere
( ) Dinghies, life rafts or persons in distress

Observing a/c:
Group: 92nd
# or letter: 638
Height: 10,000

Aircraft in distress: --
Time seen: 1225
Approximate position: 50° 30'N 03° 20'E
Heading: hitting water
Height: --
Condition: bounced along
Parachutes seen: --
Dinghies seen: [blank]

Other remarks: [blank]

 
2. Enemy shipping, naval units or convoys at sea: [blank]
 
3. Other hot news: [blank]


Hot News Report

Immediate Priority
The following information is to be telephoned at once to Duty Intelligence Officer at Wing. No delays in securing or transmitting it can be permitted.

 

1. (x) Friendly a/c down in distress at sea
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress over enemy territory
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress elsewhere
( ) Dinghies, life rafts or persons in distress

Observing a/c:
Group: 92nd
# or letter: 186 Y
Height: 12,000

Aircraft in distress: B-17
Time seen: 1229
Approximate position: 5037N 0029E
Heading: [blank]
Height: ditched
Condition: ...for ditching and finally ditched
Parachutes seen: none
Dinghies seen: none

Other remarks: [blank]

 
2. Enemy shipping, naval units or convoys at sea: [blank]
 
3. Other hot news: [blank]


Hot News Report

Immediate Priority
The following information is to be telephoned at once to Duty Intelligence Officer at Wing. No delays in securing or transmitting it can be permitted.

 

1. (x) Friendly a/c down in distress at sea
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress over enemy territory
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress elsewhere
( ) Dinghies, life rafts or persons in distress

Observing a/c:
Group: 92nd
# or letter: 717 L
Height: 16,000

Aircraft in distress: [blank]
Time seen: 1221
Approximate position: 320
Heading: reporting a/c
Height: [blank]
Condition: [blank]
Parachutes seen: [blank]
Dinghies seen: [blank]

Other remarks: crossed out by their parachutes. Probable dinghy in water (doughnut shaped object with something trailing behind)

 
2. Enemy shipping, naval units or convoys at sea: [blank]
 
3. Other hot news: [blank]


Hot News Report

Immediate Priority
The following information is to be telephoned at once to Duty Intelligence Officer at Wing. No delays in securing or transmitting it can be permitted.

 

1. ( ) Friendly a/c down in distress at sea
(x) Friendly a/c down in distress over enemy territory
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress elsewhere
( ) Dinghies, life rafts or persons in distress

Observing a/c:
Group: 92nd
# or letter: 717
Height: 24,000

Aircraft in distress: saw three B-17s seen
Time seen: 1054, 1017, 1002
Approximate position: five approx. 4855 0850
Heading: [blank]
Height: 15,000-20,000
Condition: 3 a/c descending rapidly and heading toward Switzerland
Parachutes seen: none
Dinghies seen: [blank]

Other remarks: a/c under control and heading for Switzerland

 
2. Enemy shipping, naval units or convoys at sea: [blank]
 
3. Other hot news: [blank]


Hot News Report

Immediate Priority
The following information is to be telephoned at once to Duty Intelligence Officer at Wing. No delays in securing or transmitting it can be permitted.

 

1. ( ) Friendly a/c down in distress at sea
(x) Friendly a/c down in distress over enemy territory
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress elsewhere
( ) Dinghies, life rafts or persons in distress

Observing a/c:
Group: 92nd
# or letter: 717 L
Height: 15,000

Aircraft in distress: B-17
Time seen: 1200
Approximate position: approx. N edge of Paris 48° 58'N 02° 20'E
Heading: SW
Height: 6,000
Condition: under control and gliding down
Parachutes seen: no chutes
Dinghies seen: [blank]

Other remarks: [blank]

 
2. Enemy shipping, naval units or convoys at sea: [blank]
 
3. Other hot news: [blank]


Hot News Report

Immediate Priority
The following information is to be telephoned at once to Duty Intelligence Officer at Wing. No delays in securing or transmitting it can be permitted.

 

1. ( ) Friendly a/c down in distress at sea
(x) Friendly a/c down in distress over enemy territory
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress elsewhere
( ) Dinghies, life rafts or persons in distress

Observing a/c:
Group: 92nd
# or letter: 717 L
Height: 16,000

Aircraft in distress: B-17
Time seen: 1156
Approximate position: 2925N 0148E
Heading: North
Height: 10,000 feet
Condition: heading north in a glide
Parachutes seen: 3 or 4 chutes seen
Dinghies seen: --

Other remarks: [blank]

 
2. Enemy shipping, naval units or convoys at sea: [blank]
 
3. Other hot news: [blank]


Hot News Report

Immediate Priority
The following information is to be telephoned at once to Duty Intelligence Officer at Wing. No delays in securing or transmitting it can be permitted.

 

1. ( ) Friendly a/c down in distress at sea
(x) Friendly a/c down in distress over enemy territory
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress elsewhere
( ) Dinghies, life rafts or persons in distress

Observing a/c:
Group: 92nd
# or letter: 186 Y
Height: 16,000

Aircraft in distress: B-17
Time seen: 1155
Approximate position: 4920N 0145E
Heading: no heading
Height: 13,000
Condition: this a/c gliding down through clouds
Parachutes seen: 4
Dinghies seen: none

Other remarks: This a/c gliding down and crew leisurely jumping out. A/c under controlled glide. No smoke and apparently all engines turning over.

 
2. Enemy shipping, naval units or convoys at sea: [blank]
 
3. Other hot news: [blank]


Hot News Report

Immediate Priority
The following information is to be telephoned at once to Duty Intelligence Officer at Wing. No delays in securing or transmitting it can be permitted.

 

1. ( ) Friendly a/c down in distress at sea
(x) Friendly a/c down in distress over enemy territory
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress elsewhere
( ) Dinghies, life rafts or persons in distress

Observing a/c:
Group: 92nd
# or letter: 408 Q
Height: 18,000

Aircraft in distress: B-17 from group ahead
Time seen: 1020
Approximate position: 48° 20' 06° 20'E
Heading: 250° mag
Height: went through clouds 12,000
Condition: going down in ... [stick?]... glide with fighters after him
Parachutes seen: none
Dinghies seen: [blank]

Other remarks: [blank]

 
2. Enemy shipping, naval units or convoys at sea: [blank]
 
3. Other hot news: [blank]


Hot News Report

Immediate Priority
The following information is to be telephoned at once to Duty Intelligence Officer at Wing. No delays in securing or transmitting it can be permitted.

 

1. ( ) Friendly a/c down in distress at sea
(x) Friendly a/c down in distress over enemy territory
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress elsewhere
( ) Dinghies, life rafts or persons in distress

Observing a/c:
Group: 92nd
# or letter: 408 Q
Height: 24,000

Aircraft in distress: B-17
Time seen: 1000
Approximate position: IP
Heading: circling down
Height: last seen going through clouds at 16,000 feet
Condition: smoking badly circling down
Parachutes seen: none
Dinghies seen: [blank]

Other remarks: this ships was to be definitely going down with fighters on him.

 
2. Enemy shipping, naval units or convoys at sea: [blank]
 
3. Other hot news: [blank]


Hot News Report

Immediate Priority
The following information is to be telephoned at once to Duty Intelligence Officer at Wing. No delays in securing or transmitting it can be permitted.

 

1. ( ) Friendly a/c down in distress at sea
(x) Friendly a/c down in distress over enemy territory
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress elsewhere
( ) Dinghies, life rafts or persons in distress

Observing a/c:
Group: 92nd
# or letter: 186 Y
Height: 18,000

Aircraft in distress: B-17
Time seen: 0842
Approximate position: 4930N 0325
Heading: SE
Height: 15,000
Condition: seven fighters on it and going down under control
Parachutes seen: none
Dinghies seen: [blank]

Other remarks: [blank]

 
2. Enemy shipping, naval units or convoys at sea: [blank]
 
3. Other hot news: [blank]


Hot News Report

Immediate Priority
The following information is to be telephoned at once to Duty Intelligence Officer at Wing. No delays in securing or transmitting it can be permitted.

 

1. ( ) Friendly a/c down in distress at sea
(x) Friendly a/c down in distress over enemy territory
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress elsewhere
( ) Dinghies, life rafts or persons in distress

Observing a/c:
Group: 92nd
# or letter: N 198
Height: 17,000

Aircraft in distress: B-17 unknown
Time seen: 0840
Approximate position: 49° 30'N 03° 40E
Heading: 130
Height: 8,000
Condition: losing altitude but under control
Parachutes seen: no chutes seen
Dinghies seen: [blank]

Other remarks: [blank]

 
2. Enemy shipping, naval units or convoys at sea: [blank]
 
3. Other hot news: [blank]


Hot News Report

Immediate Priority
The following information is to be telephoned at once to Duty Intelligence Officer at Wing. No delays in securing or transmitting it can be permitted.

 

1. ( ) Friendly a/c down in distress at sea
(x) Friendly a/c down in distress over enemy territory
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress elsewhere
( ) Dinghies, life rafts or persons in distress

Observing a/c:
Group: 92nd
# or letter: 186 Y
Height: 24,000

Aircraft in distress: B-17
Time seen: 1000 hours
Approximate position: 8 miles SE Stuttgart
Heading:
Height: 20,000
Condition: going down in spin with several fighters around him
Parachutes seen: no chutes
Dinghies seen: [blank]

Other remarks: B-17 spun down into clouds; no chutes seen

 
2. Enemy shipping, naval units or convoys at sea: [blank]
 
3. Other hot news: [blank]


Hot News Report

Immediate Priority
The following information is to be telephoned at once to Duty Intelligence Officer at Wing. No delays in securing or transmitting it can be permitted.

 

1. ( ) Friendly a/c down in distress at sea
(x) Friendly a/c down in distress over enemy territory
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress elsewhere
( ) Dinghies, life rafts or persons in distress

Observing a/c:
Group: 92nd
# or letter: 186 Y
Height: 24,000

Aircraft in distress: saw H 841 B-17
Time seen: 0950
Approximate position: 4025N 0850E
Heading: went south
Height: 24,000
Condition: went south with one engine feathered heading into Switzerland
Parachutes seen: no chutes seen
Dinghies seen: no dinghies seen

Other remarks: held altitude and went south on three engines to Switzerland

 
2. Enemy shipping, naval units or convoys at sea: [blank]
 
3. Other hot news: [blank]


Hot News Report

Immediate Priority
The following information is to be telephoned at once to Duty Intelligence Officer at Wing. No delays in securing or transmitting it can be permitted.

 

1. ( ) Friendly a/c down in distress at sea
(x) Friendly a/c down in distress over enemy territory
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress elsewhere
( ) Dinghies, life rafts or persons in distress

Observing a/c:
Group: 92nd
# or letter: 186 Y
Height: 24,000

Aircraft in distress: B-17
Time seen: 1003 hours
Approximate position: 7 miles SW of Stuttgart
Heading: [blank]
Height: 20,000
Condition: spinning down with fighters around
Parachutes seen: no
Dinghies seen: no

Other remarks: B-17 went down one-half mile from first B-17 seen near the target 8 miles away from Stuttgart

 
2. Enemy shipping, naval units or convoys at sea: [blank]
 
3. Other hot news: [blank]


Hot News Report

hand-printed

 

1. 92 Group
186 Y
1159 hours

saw a B-17 going down at 15,000. We were at 16,000 feet. This a/c gliding down and turning back to land. This a/c last seen 4940N, 0130E going through clouds under perfect control. All props turning. Four chutes seen, one of which opened, but did not balloon out. It trailed behind like a ribbon.


Hot News Report

Immediate Priority
The following information is to be telephoned at once to Duty Intelligence Officer at Wing. No delays in securing or transmitting it can be permitted.

 

1. ( ) Friendly a/c down in distress at sea
(x) Friendly a/c down in distress over enemy territory
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress elsewhere
( ) Dinghies, life rafts or persons in distress

Observing a/c:
Group: 92nd
# or letter: 198 M
Height: 24,000

Aircraft in distress: B-17 unknown
Time seen: 0947
Approximate position: approximately over Stuttgart
Heading: 50°
Height: 12,000
Condition: heavily hit by flak, smoking and in a deep dive
Parachutes seen: none
Dinghies seen: [blank]

Other remarks: [blank]

 
2. Enemy shipping, naval units or convoys at sea: [blank]
 
3. Other hot news: [blank]


Hot News Report

Immediate Priority
The following information is to be telephoned at once to Duty Intelligence Officer at Wing. No delays in securing or transmitting it can be permitted.

 

1. ( ) Friendly a/c down in distress at sea
(x) Friendly a/c down in distress over enemy territory
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress elsewhere
( ) Dinghies, life rafts or persons in distress

Observing a/c:
Group: 92nd
# or letter: 198 M
Height: 24,000

Aircraft in distress: B-17 unknown
Time seen: 1019
Approximate position: 48° 50'N-07° 50'E
Heading: 330
Height: 12,000
Condition: going down fast out of control
Parachutes seen: no chutes seen
Dinghies seen: [blank]

Other remarks: [blank]

 
2. Enemy shipping, naval units or convoys at sea: [blank]
 
3. Other hot news:


Hot News Report

Immediate Priority
The following information is to be telephoned at once to Duty Intelligence Officer at Wing. No delays in securing or transmitting it can be permitted.

 

1. ( ) Friendly a/c down in distress at sea
(x) Friendly a/c down in distress over enemy territory
( ) Friendly a/c down in distress elsewhere
( ) Dinghies, life rafts or persons in distress

Observing a/c:
Group: 92nd
# or letter: 198
Height: 16,000

Aircraft in distress: B-17 unknown
Time seen: 1136
Approximate position: 10 miles north of Paris
Heading: 340°
Height: 10,000
Condition: enemy fighters swarming over him
Parachutes seen: 10
Dinghies seen: [blank]

Other remarks: enemy fighters in great numbers were keeping up an incessant attack on the straggler. Crew apparently set autopilot and all bailed out. All chutes delayed opening for a long time, but all did open.

 
2. Enemy shipping, naval units or convoys at sea: [blank]
 
3. Other hot news: [blank]

 


Debriefing Reports

[NOTE: In the interest of saving space, any questions that were left completely blank by the airmen in have been omitted from the respective reports.]

Photo
326th Squadron
a/c 351 Z

0606 take-off

 

P 1 Lt. James K. McLaughlin
C Maj. McGeehee Word, Jr.
N 1 Lt. Henry A. Hughes
B 1 Lt. Lee J. Lockwood
R T/Sgt. Thomas M. Shelton
TT T/Sgt. C. Eidson
BT Sgt. Charles H. Van Horne
RW Sgt James L. Ford
LW Sgt. Charles G. Thurresson
T S/Sgt. John E. Foley

Enemy fighter opposition:
75-100. Mostly 109s over Germany. Dirty gray with wings cannon mounted light like Spits.
Few twin engine ships going in, nose going in and tail coming out

Air to air bombing: no

Fighter support:
Think they saw them coming out-- not sure-- unknown-- only for a few minutes at most

Gun flak:

 

Time Place Altitude Intensity Accuracy
Altitude
for
Deflection
Color Barrage or Predicated Following
0832 St. Quentin 16,200 meager good off to right black following
0843 Raims 18,000 meager good off to right black following
0953 Stuttgart 24,000 moderate to intense good all around black barrage and following
1151 Beauvais 16,000 meager good white black following

Report unusual phenomena:
one huge red burst at Stuttgart

one Fort down halfway between Paris and coast under control
six chutes seen

Results of Bombing:

 

  1. Did you get over the target? Strassbourg; 10/10 cloud over Stuttgart
    Time: 1016 1/2
    Altitude: 24,000
    Heading: 29°
  2. # of bombs dropped: all
    If not all, why?
  3. # bombs loaded on ship: 40
    # bombs jettisoned: 0
    # bombs brought back: 0
    Height and colors of smoke or fires set: not observed
  4. Did any missing a/c bomb target? unknown

Route Followed

  1. Leaving English coast: as briefed
  2. Entering enemy coast: as briefed
  3. Leaving enemy coast: East of Dieppe 14,000 1214
  4. Returning English coast: Hastings 4,000-- 1234 hours

Crew observations:
camouflage (pictures taken of it) Boccoret? 20,500

Casualties: none

Comments/suggestions:
change English sight dark glass is no good for daytime

Battle damage: none

 


327th Squadron
890 F

0619 take-off

 

P 1 Lt. Richard A. Christenson
C 2 Lt. Lee D. Crabtree
N 2 Lt. Arthur Stienmetz
B 2 Lt. William E. Harnly
R S/Sgt. Michael G. Zelenak
TT Sgt. James T. Cimini
BT Sgt. Jordan W. Young
RW Sgt. Joseph W. Cagle
LW Sgt. Norman R. Wagner
T Sgt. Kenneth R. Moore

Enemy fighter opposition:
went down near Posse 23 mi NW of Paris. Out of gas 23 miles No of Paris

None injured
plane destroyed

[rest of report blank]

 


[handwritten on lined paper:]

Bogard's ship

South of Paris fighter attacked at ....at 5:00. Hit Bogard's a/c in tail with big gunfire. After explosion rudder whipped around. Put wheels down. Stayed level, but lost altitude and speed. Three chutes opened. These came out of nose. Probably waist and tail gunmen dead. Horizontal stabilizer held. The a/c went into a flat spin going down. No one saw him hit. Tail gunner Sgt. Cupp on Booker's crew saw FW 190s shoot at parachutists from Bogard's ship. Radio Op. on Booker's ship also saw these FWs fire at parachutists.

 


327th Squadron
000 D

 

P 1 Lt. Wayne C. Bogard
C 2 Lt. Robert D. Larsen
N 2 Lt. James M. McGrew
B Sgt. Tayler D. Harrison
R T/Sgt. Max Gibbs
TT T/Sgt. Arthur R. Beach
BT S/Sgt. Floyd M. Carl
RW S/Sgt. Herschel L. Richardson
LW Sgt. Frank T. Lusic
T S/Sgt. Cloe R. Crutchfield

Enemy fighter opposition:
Booker's crew in a/c 007 reports they saw Bogard's ship go down a little south and west of Paris under the following circumstances: [sic]

[then someone else wrote:]

It is confirmed by right waist gunner that ten chutes got out of the plane.

 


photo
407th Squadron
42-30010 X

 

P 1 Lt Colman R. Asher
C F/O Harvey F. Protzman
N 2 Lt. George R. Francis
B 2 Lt. John S. Chapman
R T/Sgt. Otto H. Pfannebecker
TT T/Sgt. James H. Jones
BT S/Sgt. William Rice
RW George C. Maorki
LW S/Sgt. James G. Wilson
T S/Sgt. Harry H. Plyler

Enemy fighter opposition:
Lt. George's crew in a/c 717 reported that at 0811 Asher's a/c number 010 crash landed at 0210E and 5015 N. Two chutes opened and one did not open. A/c 2351 reported that at 0815 hours Asher's a/c number 010 was seen to burn up in the middle and one wing come off at 16,500 feet at 5020N, 0210E. Five chutes came out, one of which did not open. No flak or fighters at the time.

A/c 408 reported Asher's a/c No 010 peeled off to right, circling down at 5020N, 0200E and then exploded. Three chutes were seen. One didn't open. A/c no. 712 R reported that Asher's no. 010 was seen to disintegrate and one wing fall off and burn in the middle section. Observation at 0815 hours at 5015N 0200 E.

A/c 996 reported that at 0841 Asher's a/c no. 010 was seen at to [sic] explode in two at the wings after number three engine caught on fire. Three chutes seen. One did not open.

Lt. Lyng's crew in a/c no. 186 report that they saw Asher's number two engine afire and smoking and then burst. Some white smoke seemed to come out of the fuselage followed at once by heavy black smoke. Sparks seemed to come out of the central section of the fuselage as though the bombs inside were exploding. Then this a/c nosed over and dove down at a very steep angle. Just before diving down the bombs were jettisoned and these did not then appear to be burning as they fell. The bombs fell in a wood. Asher's a/c finished its dive and crashed 400 yards from the sight of the bombs. Hit and seen to explode there.

[rest of report blank]

 


327th Squadron
648 U
low squadron lead element

 

P 1 Lt. Ellison Miles
C 2 Lt. John C. Qua
N F/O Leighton D. Paterson
B S/Sgt. Donald L. Murray
R S/Sgt. Edward A. Komsky
TT T/Sgt. Lester L. Menken
BT S/Sgt. Glenn D. Phillippe
RW S/Sgt. Norman E. Conrad
LW Sgt. Thomas R. Buckingham
T Sgt. Emil A. Kirwin

Enemy fighter opposition:
#3 15-18 FW 190s dark gray with white nose. Some dull gray. Few yellow noses. Mostly tail attacks into about 600 yards. Not too eager.

Air to air bombing: none

Enemy use of friendly a/c: none

Fighter support:
Noticed a few P-47s high above over Paris coming out. No fighter support

Gun flak:

 

Time Place Altitude Intensity Accuracy
Altitude
for
Deflection
Color Barrage or Predicated Following
1000 target 24,000 intense good trailing black barrage

Results of Bombing:

 

  1. Did you get over the target? small village east of target [written in pencil above is Baden Baden]
    Time: 1008
    Altitude: 24,000
    Heading: 295
  2. # bombs dropped: 40 x 65
    If not all, why? all
  3. # bombs loaded on ship: 40 x 65
  4. # bombs jettisoned: none
    # bombs brought back: none
    Height and colors of smoke or fires set:  scattered; fires in target area
  5. Did any missing a/c bomb target? [blank]

Route Followed

  1. Leaving English coast: [inbetweeen first two lines is written] in formation
  2. Entering enemy coast:
  3. Leaving enemy coast: 1214 on course 16,000 feet
  4. Returning English coast: 1238 on course 10,000

Crew observations:
large airfield spotted at 49° 42N 02° 20' E large number of planes on ground

Casualties: none

Flying equipment failures: none

Comments/suggestions: shorter missions and more gasoline

Battle damage: none

 


407th Squadron
42-29965 L
second high squadron

0612 take-off
1247 landing
ditched six miles off French coast north of Le Ha... [Havre?]

 

P 1 Lt. Frederick T. Prasse
C 2 Lt. Joseph S. Thornton
N 2 Lt. David C. Besbris
B S/Sgt. Fred Champion
R T/Sgt. Laurence E. Dennis
TT S/Sgt. John Geegee
BT S/Sgt. Jn W. Disher
RW S/Sgt. Otto F. Trammer
LW S/Sgt. Charles H. Hartnett
T S/Sgt. Roland A. Galloway

Enemy fighter opposition:
75-100 FW's-- 109's-- yellow noses. gray with white noses. dull camouflage colour. Came in on nose in groups of five to twelve echloned in V so as to hit both low and high squadron at same time.

Enemy use of friendly a/c: none

Fighter support: very good

Gun flak:

 

Time Place Altitude Intensity Accuracy
Altitude
for
Deflection
Color Barrage or Predicated Following
1000 Stuttgart 24,000 moderate good fair black predicted con

Unusual phenomena: none

Results of Bombing:

 

  1. Did you get over the target? Wasselone east of Strassburg
    Time: 1006
    Altitude: 24,000
    Heading: 270° mag
  2. # bombs dropped: 40x65
    If not all, why? all
  3. # bombs loaded on ship: 40x65
  4. # bombs jettisoned: none
    # bombs brought back: none
    Height and colors of smoke or fires set:  scattered bomb bursts all over countryside
  5. Did any missing a/c bomb target?

Route Followed

  1. Leaving English coast:
  2. Entering enemy coast:
  3. Leaving enemy coast: joined formation with letter H about 16 minutes after Strassburg 1230-- ditched at 1247
  4. Returning English coast:

Crew observations: none

Casualties: Disher and Hartnett slight injuries from ditching

Flying equipment failures: none

Comments/suggestions:
dinghies should be checked periodically. Escape kits and rations in dinghies should be waterproofed

Battle damage: slight

 


407th Squadron
42-3428 O
photo ship

# 3 in lead element
high squadron

0611 take-off
ditched 1220
50° 20' N 00° 25'E

 

P 2 Lt. Robert W. Carlson
C 2 Lt. David T. Kindt
N 2 Lt. James R. Blackburn
B 2 Lt. Frank A. Price
R T/Sgt. Hubert E. Sprague
TT T/Sgt. Bobby L. Boutwell
BT Sgt Clifford J. Pruitt
RW Sgt. Frank J. Holczman
LW Sgt. John M. Trainer
T Sgt. Roy P. Ladd

Enemy fighter opposition: 50
[penciled off to side:] rescued

FW 190s mostly. There were some Me 109s. One JU 88 was also seen. Yellow markings in tail. Some e/a robin's egg blue underneath. Came in nose and tail. Most attacks came in from nose in twos and threes. Some e/a came in from tail at 70° L. Some came in from same angle on waist from 5:30. Two FWs were = with low squadron at 500 yards distance flying || with a/c. These e/a made no attempt to attack. One B-17 dropped landing gear and headed toward England. Two FWs attacked this a/c.

Unusual phenomena:
none except white burst... [stapled over]... seen near target area at Stuttgart and which appeared 3,000 feet above a/c.

Results of Bombing:

 

  1. Did you get over the target? Wasselone
    Time: 1006 1/2
    Altitude: 24,000
    Heading: 320° mag
  2. # bombs dropped: 40 100s
    If not all, why? --
  3. # bombs loaded on ship: 40 100s
  4. # bombs jettisoned: no
    # bombs brought back: no
    Height and colors of smoke or fires set:
    Bombs of formation hit center of town. Gray smoke was seen rising to almost 1,000 feet.
  5. Did any missing a/c bomb target?
    Asher's a/c did not bomb. Board and Christensen were not seen when a/c was seen to peel off at Paris area. Identity unknown.

Route Followed

  1. Leaving English coast: followed formation straight across
  2. Entering enemy coast:
  3. Leaving enemy coast:
  4. Returning English coast:

Crew observations:
A/D on route back marked with bomb craters. Small fires were observed in several woods on route in mountains...[near?]... small towns

Casualties:
none from enemy action. Lt. Carlson, Lt. Price, Sgt. Sprague and Sgt. Ladd [penned in above] T/Sgt. Boutwell [penciled in above that] Sgt. Trainer were injured in ditching. All members of crew suffered scratches in ditching

Flying equipment failures:
Gee would not function on way back
ball turret would not take sufficient oxygen
Parachute split in back (co-pilot)

Comments/suggestions:
Court martial charges should be prepared on anyone instrumental in the planning of this mission. The reason is that gasoline is not sufficient for mission of this length.

Battle damage:
small radio chairs should be removed and larger...put in their place

[penciled in] battle damage none

 


327th Squadron
007 B
lead second element
low squadron
low group

0616 take-off
1258 landing

 

P 1 Lt. John O. Booker
C 2 Lt. James A. McAvoy
N 2 Lt. John J. Bradley
B 2 Lt. Charles E. Bennett
R T/Sgt. Porfirio D. Garcia
TT T/Sgt. Wayne E. Licher
BT S/Sgt. Ralph A. Richardson
RW S/Sgt. John W. Hancock
LW Sgt. Eugene M. Simpson
T S/ Ray V. Cupp

Enemy fighter opposition:
150-200 e/a seen. Saw FW 190s, Me 109s at Suttguart. Saw a couple of t/e e/a ...ing out wide. Nearly all FW 190s on the way out S & W of Paris had yellow noses and silver fuselages. First saw e/a about 50 miles inside coast-- ... [mostly?]... Me 109s. We didn't see any more until target. Then no attacks till SW of Paris about 10 to 20 minutes. E/a hit us there and left us just as the Spits arrived at Le Havre. Me 109s seen at first coming in with or firing out of range and did not close. At target e/a also stayed out a long way and did not seem to attack. The e/a S and SE of Paris really were hot. Very... Mes S and W of Paris. Mostly FW 190s there and they looked like new ships.

Air to air bombing: no air to air bombing

Enemy use of friendly a/c: no enemy use of our a/c

Fighter support: Saw some Spits a few miless off of Le Havre

Gun flak:

 

Time Place Altitude Intensity Accuracy
Altitude
for
Deflection
Color Barrage or Predicated Following
target 24,000 moderate good a little ahead black cf

This flak is consderable...between Stuttgart and the target to the NW of Stuttgart

... on S side of a/d E of Paris that has a corkscrew and folding painted camouflage on runways

Unusual phenomena:
A bright red burst forward...[page stapled]... leaving target was...IB bombs colliding in mid-air.

Results of Bombing:

 

  1. Did you get over the target? yes
    Time: 1000
    Altitude: 24,000
    Heading: 330°
  2. # bombs dropped: 0
    If not all, why? overcast
  3. # bombs loaded on ship: 40 65 IBs
  4. # bombs jettisoned: 40 65 IBs
    113...near target area # bombs brought back: none
    Height and colors of smoke or fires set:   several towns and woods afire from haphazard bombing
  5. Did any missing a/c bomb target? [blank]

Route Followed

  1. Leaving English coast: --
  2. Entering enemy coast: --
  3. Leaving enemy coast: --
  4. Returning English coast: --

Crew observations:
One FW observed to have large gun installed on gas tanks under each wing. One FW also observed to have extra large protuberance under fuselage like gas tank or big gun. Some FWs fired at men parachuting down.

Casualties:
Top turret gunner suffered flak or 20 mm wound in left leg
Pilot, co-pilot, navigator banged and bruised in ditching

Flying equipment failures: none

Comments/suggestions:
Check parachutes. Two seen to string out and not open. Several did not open at all.

Ammo should be put in boxes and not jammed in. Should be laid in orderly. Otherwise won't come out.

...had a ...on nose again

Battle damage:
Ship lost in ditching.
Prefer British Mae Wests. Clip on U.S. kind break off.
Should have some ropes in a/c to use after ditching in getting boys out of water

 


handwritten on lined paper:

Asher's ship

#3 engine smoking 10-15 miles...inside French coast. Asher pulled off to right. One chute came out and strung out but did not open. Only one other seen before a/c hit ground. Pale brown smoke turning to heavy black smoke in large cloud streamed out of fuselage.

IB bombs had loose arming wire especially after pins pulled. Very dangerous.

 


another lined page

A/c ditched 20 miles SE of Selsey Bill. Time was 1258. In water one hour and ten minutes. Picked up by ASR launch number 198

 


Gee and radio out. This the second time the radio could not be tuned and this time the Gee out. ...[word scratched out] This is the third time for the Gee being out.A/c 707 therefore had not been repaired on the Gee and radio for two and three successive trips.

 


Tactics of E/a

standard nose approaches going in to France. South and W of Paris we were in a formation of about 18. Below us a formation of 18 were seen. The e/a in about numbers of 35 ran around the low formation in a circle. They attacked one after the other after each round from 12 to 2:00 and pass made, then reformed. Were several tail attacks and an occasional beam attacks [sic]. E/a gradually worked up to our formation and we got attacks from nose and tail both. Attack would come from one going under and followed by one going through the formation and then split up the ... core.

 


[NOTE: A corner of the page is torn off this report.]

326th Squadron
802 Q
...
second element lead ship

0608 take-off
1245 (Deanland) landing

 

P 2 Lt. William W. Holden
C 2 Lt. Leslie W. Barnes
N 2 Lt. Samuel Acquviva
B Sgt. Charles H. Mullens
R T/Sgt. James R. Enochs
TT T/Sgt. Adolph M. Kultti [sic]
BT S/Sgt. George M. McCorkle
RW S/Sgt. Leslie E. McDaniels
LW S/Sgt. George W. Woiblett
T S/Sgt. Charles B. Kendall

Enemy fighter opposition:
15 FW 190s with black and white bellies. Some with yellow tails and nose.

Tactics:
Would attack from 6:00 level.

Air to air bombing: none

Enemy use of friendly a/c: none

Fighter support:
1120 49° 05'N-04° 00'E 19,000
How long were they in flight?   1210    Were they in any combat while seen?   Yes

Gun flak:

 

Time Place Altitude Intensity Accuracy
Altitude
for
Deflection
Color Barrage or Predicated Following
0807 50° 27'N 01° 32'E 16,000 meager low left black barrage
0842 49° 30N 03° 35 16,000 meager low right black EAR
0955 Stuttgart 23,300 ...in time okay okay black barrage

Unusual phenomena:
bursts of red... [torn off]... flak over target

Results of Bombing:

 

  1. Did you get over the target? yes
    Time: 1017
    Altitude: 24,000
    Heading: 235° mag
  2. # bombs dropped: 40x60
    If not all, why? yes
  3. # bombs loaded on ship: 48
  4. # bombs jettisoned: none
    # bombs brought back: none
    Height and colors of smoke or fires set: black [double underlined] 200 feet Karlescrue [sic]
  5. Did any missing a/c bomb target? none observed

Route Followed

  1. Leaving English coast: Dungeness ht 13,800
  2. Entering enemy coast: 50° 25'N 01° 33'E 807 15,800
  3. Leaving enemy coast: 48° 57'N-01° 12'E 1214 14,000
  4. Returning English coast: Beachy Head 1231 landed...

Crew observations:
12 small boats at 49° 55'N 01° 00E 1214p 14,000 anchored

Casualties:
tail gunner burned feet on heated...

Flying equipment failures:
right top turret gun jammed

Battle damage:
glass in R launching light and nose gun plexiglass

 


326th Squadron
063 J
second element
lead squadron
low group

0607 take-off
2135 landing

 

P 1 Lt. Blair Belongia
C 2 Lt. Robert B. Klein
N F/O Howard F. Eaton
B 2 Lt. George D. Jackson
R S/Sgt. James Q. Lovett
TT S/Sgt. Charles M. Few
BT S/Sgt. Samuel A. Purvis
RW Sgt Alfred J. Antonacci
LW S/Sgt. Stanley C. Sztorc
T S/Sgt. Joseph M. Walsh

Enemy fighter opposition:
1235 ditched Pedensey Bay ...mi off shore near Beachy Head

four ships heading for Switzerland
30 to 50 e/a
sea very rough, but perfect landing
allowed to gas
lost first engine five min after crossing enemy coast at 1215, second five minutes later, last two out within two minutes of each other 1230-1233. Hit by flak near primary target area caused
(most attacks from tail)

Tactics of the E/A:
loss of gas and forward controls and flew sideways. Picked up 1310. ship... a/c floated 35 minutes. Fishing boat took them off wing air sea

(none)

Air to air bombing:
came about ten minutes later. Arrived at Hittaigel Wi...Arrived at... just after 4th Wing and then passed them. Left our group five minutes before ...enemy coast.

Fighter support: Gunners shoot at P-47s lead ship of our group left...

Gun flak:

 

Time Place Altitude Intensity Accuracy
Altitude
for
Deflection
Color Barrage or Predicated Following
Berck sur Mer intense 5,000 ... ...
target guns scattered over large area
barrage at Stuttgart

Unusual phenomena: One burst red flak over primary

Results of Bombing:

 

  1. Did you get over the target? Strassburg drop on lead ship
    Time: 1016
    Altitude: 24,000
    Heading: 290°
  2. # bombs dropped: 40 100 IBs
    If not all, why?
  3. # bombs loaded on ship:
  4. # bombs jettisoned:
    # bombs brought back:
    Height and colors of smoke or fires set:
  5. Did any missing a/c bomb target?

Route Followed

  1. Leaving English coast: with formation
  2. Entering enemy coast:
  3. Leaving enemy coast:
  4. Returning English coast:

Crew observations: none

Casualties: none; minor cuts and scratches

Battle damage:
controls jammed and fuel tanks hit whole between #2 and fuselage

 


326th Squadron
712 R
No 4 in diamond of second element lead group

0609 take-off
1510 landing

 

P 2 Lt. William F. Whelan
C 2 Lt. Frank F. Tomlinson
N 2 Lt. Robert W. Purdom
B 2 Lt. Fred S. Rodway
R T/Sgt. John D. Neville
TT T/Sgt. Fred S. Hecker
BT S/Sgt. Glenn H. Winch
RW S/Sgt. James D. Batson
LW S/Sgt. Ralph S. Martinez
T S/Sgt. Walter J. Zimmerman

Enemy fighter opposition:

Estimated no. of a/c seen: 40-50
Types and markings:
new Me 109s silver-- yellow stripes on wings. Some black and white FW 190s. One Me 109 camouflaged brown and green. Nearly all attacks from seven and five o'clock. Few nose. Some level.

Air to air bombing: none

Enemy use of friendly a/c: none

Fighter support: Paris to coast 19,000-20,000 feet at 1145 to 1215
How long in sight, etc.: None observed

Gun flak:

 

Time Place Altitude Intensity Accuracy
Altitude
for
Deflection
Color Barrage or Predicated Following
0833 St. Quentin 16,000 good meager left black predicted
0844 Laons 17,000 meager good not noticed black unknown
0946
to 0948
Stuttgart 24,000 intense good ... black barrage
1215 Dieppe 12,000 moderate; followed B-17 down to water good good black predicted

Unusual phenomena: Field at Albert had been bombed, but hangars not hit. No activity.

Results of Bombing:

 

  1. Did you get over the target? hit Karlsruhe-- Baden Baden
    Time: 1008 1/2
    Altitude: 23,500
    Heading: 282° mag
  2. # bombs dropped: 40
    If not all, why?
  3. # bombs loaded on ship: 40
  4. # bombs jettisoned:
    # bombs brought back:
    Height and colors of smoke or fires set: couldn't see
  5. Did any missing a/c bomb target? ... no missing a/c bomb target

Route Followed

  1. Leaving English coast: as briefed
  2. Entering enemy coast: as briefed
  3. Leaving enemy coast: five miles... [W?] Le Treport at 12,500 to 1215 hours
  4. Returning English coast: Boxhill at 3200 at 1237 hours

Crew observations:
Saw Asher's ship (X) go. First chute was burning. Saw two more come out of ship.

Casualties: none

Comments/suggestions:
Put straps around wrists of heated gloves so they may be tightened.

Battle damage: blank

 


326th Squadron
717 L
#3 lead element

0607 take-off
1315 landing

 

P C 1 Lt. Chas. S. George
C P 2 Lt. Claude A. Ahrenholz
N 2 Lt. William J. O'Gonnel
B 1 Lt. James J. Ryan
R T/Sgt. Glenn R. Hansen
TT T/Sgt. Robert Root
BT S/Sgt. George T. Seymour
RW S/Sgt. Kenneth C. Foster
LW S/Sgt. Frank L. Montemarano
T S/Sgt. Darrel L. Balke

Enemy fighter opposition:
Me 109s and FW 190s about 75. No t/e a/c. E/a picked up at 5113N 0222E at 0926 hours. E/a left us 1045 hours at 0515E 4855N. E/a picked up again at 1115 hours at 4820 0410 and left us again at 1126 at 4855 0245E. E/a picked up again at 1155 at 4825N 0150E and stayed with us to coast north of Dieppe. FW 190s had yellow tails and something silver fuselages. One had some similar markings. Were a few all black. Mes and FWs. Some FWs had yellow wingtips and gray fuselages. Some red noses on deep gray fuselages.

Fighter support:
P-47s picked up at Rheims and stayed with us to English coast. Were over 100 P-47s. Provided good support. Very excellent

Gun flak:

 

Time Place Altitude Intensity Accuracy
Altitude
for
Deflection
Color Barrage or Predicated Following
0807 Berck sur Mer 16,800 moderate good wide to left pc
0843 4829 0344 18,500 meager good wide black pc
0940 to 0950 4840 to 0850 24,000 moderate very poor scattered poor black pc
1017 0720E 4845N 20,000 meager poor poor black pc
1210 Dieppe 15,000 moderate to ...[getting?] otc black pc
target at target saw one large... in the sky for a time...even for lc

Results of Bombing:

 

  1. Did you get over the target? yes (Pforzatim)
    Time: 1007 1/2
    Altitude: 24,500
    Heading: 312°
  2. # bombs dropped: 40 60 lb IBs
    If not all, why?
  3. # bombs loaded on ship: 40 60 lb IBs
  4. # bombs jettisoned:
    # bombs brought back:
    Height and colors of smoke or fires set: ground to center and edge of town including marshalling yard in town
  5. Did any missing a/c bomb target? Stuttgart was overcast at 10/10

Route Followed

  1. Leaving English coast: Dungeness 0756 16,300
  2. Entering enemy coast: Berck sur Mer 0807 16,900
  3. Leaving enemy coast: North of Dieppe 1214 14,000
  4. Returning English coast: Hastings 1246 6,000

Crew observations:
Bernais marshalling yard is in use again though heavily bombed a little time ago. Albert air drome showed evidence of recent terrific explosion.

Casualties: none

Flying equipment failures: none
Parachutes on other ships did not open occasionally.

Comments/suggestions:
Need movie cameras or the ships should have Tokyo tanks on board.

Battle damage: slight battle damage


on the back is written:

717 L Lt. George's crew
Nose and tail attacks. Nose attacks below and high. No...on high and above, ending up low. E/a would stay out at 1,000 yards as long as an occasional burst fired at them. Tail attacks were begun from above and ended at level at 6:00 with the e/a sliding off to the side. All tail attacks were single. Almost all nose attacks single. No advantage made of sun today. Tail attacks very determined. Nose attacked varied from two to ten o'clock. Most nose attacked were aimed not at the nose but on the engines of the B-17s. Stragglers were not attacked today. Left stragglers alone and concentrated on formation.

next page for Lt. George's crew

No air to air bombing
no enemy use of our a/c
Some B-17s without new AAF insignia, but did have triangles and letter H.

At target saw a lot of scattered white bursts 1,000 feet above the formation.

 


NOTE: From this point on the information on e/a, fighter support, flak, bombing and route information are not noted as it is basically the same as what is reported on the previous questionnaires. 326th Squadron
423 P
#3 second element, lead sq

0608 take-off
1440 landing

 

P 2 Lt. Ray E. Clough
C F/O James H. Dickens
N 2 Lt. Malcolm A. Champagne
B 2 Lt. William E. Fraser
R S/Sgt. Jones B. Jackson
TT S/Sgt. Hugh B. Spencer
BT Sgt. Porter W. Adams
LW Sgt. William J. Dillon
RW S/Sgt. Jack H. Calvert
T S/Sgt. Arthur B. Bomberger

Crew observations: none

Casualties: none

Flying equipment failures: none

Comments/suggestions: See interrogators

Battle damage: extremely slight. Two small holes.

 


326th Squadron
387 A
#2 lead element, lead sq

0606 take-off
1500 landing

 

P 1 Lt. James B. Foster
C 2 Lt. William B. Locke
N 2 Lt. Samuel V. Holth
B 2 Lt. Edward T. O'Grady
R S/Sgt. Richard A. Spellerberg
TT T/Sgt. Raymond Hottensteine
BT Sgt. John H. Benson
LW Sgt. James Proakis
RW Sgt Joe Pribish
T Sgt. Michael Lutska

Crew observations:
Air drome lack of activity especially true in Germany. Looked dead. More fighters in France than in Germany.

Casualties: frozen fingers on left waist gunner and right waist gunner

Flying equipment failures: no failures

Comments/suggestions:
More gas. Leader must fly at... Lead varied from 145 to 165 miles

Battle damage: slight. One hole

 


327th Squadron
165 T
#2 second element low sq

0617 take-off
1300 Selsey Billlanding

 

P 2 Lt. Raymond W. Baier
C 2 Lt. Harold C. Toombs
N 2 Lt. Fred L. Dougherty, Jr.
B 2 Lt. William F. Munro
R S/Sgt. James E. Gievell
TT S/Sgt. Donald J. Sack
BT S/Sgt. John I. Johnson
LW S/Sgt. George A. Rinko
RW S/Sgt. Vaughn E. Bowers
T Sgt. Elwood R. Newton

Crew observations:
nothing unusual. Calm flight going into target and channel.

Casualties:
Lt. Munro glass in left eye caused by empty cartidge case from a/c ahead

Flying equipment failures: Johnson ball turret gunner suit shorted out

Comments/suggestions: none

Battle damage: five holes empty shell cases

 


327th Squadron
408 Q
#3 low squadron

0606 take-off
1300 RCAF field 126 landing
1421 back to base

 

P 2 Lt. Jim H. Wood
C 2 Lt. Ralph L. Nasch
N 2 Lt. Frank A. Friedman
B Sgt. William S. Harrison
R T/Sgt. Clyde G. Watson
TT T/Sgt. William L. Warren
BT S/Sgt. John P. Walter
RW S/Sgt. Joseph W. Maxwell
LW S/Sgt. Dean Landfear
T Sgt. William J. Clark

Crew observations:
concentration of shipping seen in Rhine on course.

Casualties: none

Flying equipment failures: none

Comments/suggestions:
Aprons on tail guns hinder operations. Main reason for mission being snafu was too far on unpredictable weather. Tossed the guns and ammunition out to lighten ship and conserve gas over Germany. Would have been easy pickings for enemy fighters if they had met them on way out.

Battle damage: slight

 


327th Squadron
628 N
#2 second element lead low sq  lead ship low squadron

0614 take-off
1254 landing fighter base # 127

 

P 1 Lt. Winston J. Tucker
C F/O Carl R. Carlsen
N 2 Lt. Joseph C. Liebman
B 2 Lt. Robert H. Dorgan
R T/Sgt. David B. Stewart
TT T/Sgt. Richard H. Bragden
BT S/Sgt. Theodore Arthurston
RW S/Sgt. Morris I. Campbell
LW S/Sgt. Lewis A. Kuhnz
T S/Sgt. Robert K. Gailey

Crew observations:
Around 1002 until 1020 two B-17s headed for Switzerland. First one had H on fin.

Casualties:
Oxygen system bad on right side of ship. Very, very poor.
Itching sensations, etc.

Flying equipment failures: none

Comments/suggestions:
Trucks to site six in morning before chow

Battle damage: one hole of 50 or .03 in stablizer

 


407th Squadron
42-30708 J
lead ship high sq

0609 take-off
1600 landing

 

P 1 Lt. Sterling A. Basler
C 2 Lt. Hugh B. Hamilton, Jr.
N 2 Lt. Augustin Jacobs
B 2 Lt. John C. McParlin
R T/Sgt. Earle L. Tillyer
TT T/Sgt. Roy Wallen
BT S/Sgt. Anthony V. Gehard
RW S/Sgt. John W. Schultt
LW S/Sgt. George W. Reynard
T S/Sgt. James S. Schmitt

Crew observations: none

Casualties: none

Flying equipment failures: none

Comments/suggestions:
The manner in which the bombs were loaded was unsatisfactory. Ship was overloaded with bombs in number.

Battle damage: one hole in flap of left wing

 


407th Squadron
42-29996 R

0613 take-off
1229 landing Dungeness

 

P 1 Lt. Edward M. Grabowski
C 2 Lt. Raymond C. Bacher
N 2 Lt. Clearence G. Murphy
B S/Sgt. Ray NMI Adams
R T/Sgt. Joseph B. Aharn
TT T/Sgt. Robert S. McDonald
BT S/Sgt. Vincent A. Mahern
RW S/Sgt. Emilio D'Arcangelo
LW S/Sgt. Joseph S. Scapellato
T S/Sgt. Carl H. Drake

Crew observations: none

Casualties: none

Flying equipment failures: none

Comments/suggestions:
arms should have stand-by ships ready to go and have the windows cleaned

Battle damage: none

 


407th Squadron
42-3186 Y
#2 high sq lead element

0610 take-off
1517 landing

 

P 2 Lt. Richard W. Lyng
C 2 Lt. Paul L. Smybl
N 2 Lt. Herman W. Blanton
B S/Sgt. James.J. Spellman
R T/Sgt. Robert E. Aicher
TT T/Sgt. Harold E. Scott
BT Sgt. Donald T. Williams
RW S/Sgt. Thurmon H. Evans
LW S/Sgt. Darwin L. Cole
T S/Sgt. Clyde R. Hall

Crew observations:
Asher probably either hit by another B-17 practicing firing. #2 engine was smoking badly. Another crew member observed smoke out of fuselage. Other crew members say two engine only was smoking. Its bombs may have exploded. He dropped his bombs before he went down. He went down in one to two minutes and hit hard about 400 feet from place his bombs hit. One chute seen soon as smoke started. Possibly control cables melted by the fire.

Casualties: none
Before Asher's a/c dove down, was smoking and sparks flying out of bomb bay like burning incendiaries. Smoke from his ship was heavy black before started dive.
IBs in Lyng's a/c were loaded loosely and dangerously

Flying equipment failures: none

Comments/suggestions:
Take plane damper off guns to prevent some of ticks on tail guns.

Battle damage: slight damage

 


407th Squadron
42-3198 M
#2 rear element high sq

0611 1/2 take-off
1255 landing

 

P 2 Lt. Basil M. Jones, Jr.
C 2 Lt. Herschel D. Peal
N 2 Lt. Arthur K. Slagle
B 2 Lt. Francis X. Lothschuetz
R T/Sgt. James M. Cross
TT T/Sgt. Raymond M. Brearley
BT S/Sgt. John J. Harrington
RW S/Sgt. Martin V. Gonzales
LW S/Sgt. ... [Rock? Ross?] B. Wright, Jr.
T S/Sgt. John E. Ritzenthaler

Crew observations:
A bunch of B-17s going down, about five of them

Casualties:
Lt. Jones broken nose, cuts and lacerations of face, nose and lips. Shock.
Lt. Peale concussion, cuts of forehead and lacerations
Sgt. Harrington broken nose, cuts on face; severe shock

Flying equipment failures: none

Comments/suggestions: none

Battle damage:
slight flak damage. Plane washed out. Wing sheared off on crash landing.